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How Hospitals Deal With Mass Shootings

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Las Vegas is in the midst of a medical crisis. After Sunday night's deadly shooting, the city's hospitals are dealing with hundreds of casualties.

Here & Now's Robin Young talks with Eric Alberts, emergency preparedness manager for Orlando Health, about how he dealt with the situation after the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando.

In St. Louis, Silent Protest After Night Of Violence And Arrests

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Protesters led a silent march Monday morning in St. Louis, continuing the dayslong rallies after former police officer Jason Stockley, who is white, was found not guilty of first-degree murder in the 2011 fatal shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man.

Protests began peacefully Sunday night, but later erupted into violence, resulting in more than 80 arrestsHere & Now's Robin Young gets the latest from St. Louis Public Radio's Nancy Fowler (@NancyFowlerSTL).

Irma Recovery In St. Thomas Expected To Be Slow And Painful

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

The extent of the damage caused by Hurricane Irma in the Caribbean is still coming into view. On St. John, many residents remain without power and officials fear the fresh water supply is low.

But the devastation may be even worse on St. Thomas, where aid has been slowed by destroyed infrastructure. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with NPR's Jason Beaubien (@jasonbnpr), who is in St. Thomas.

How Presidents Use Distractions To Get Things Done

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

The same night Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas, President Trump signed a directive banning transgender people from serving in the military.

Historians Brian Balogh (@historyfellow) and Nathan Connolly (@ndbconnolly) tell Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson that presidents have often made controversial moves while public attention is focused elsewhere.

Balogh and Connolly are co-hosts of the podcast BackStory, which is produced at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

Was Irma, Harvey Coverage Too Much?

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

In the last few weeks, storm coverage of Harvey and Irma has been wall-to-wall and reporters have put themselves in the middle of hurricane-force winds and deadly storm surges. Many are asking, what draws the line between doing a public service and needlessly putting oneself at risk?

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks about storm coverage with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik (@davidfolkenflik).

Irma's Second Florida Landfall Hits Marco Island With Heavy Winds, Surge

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Hurricane Irma made its second Florida landfall on Sunday afternoon on Marco Island, covering much of the city with surge water. Remaining residents are without power or water, but the full extent of the damage is unknown.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with Marco Island city council chairman Larry Honig about what they need for the cleanup ahead.

Florida Governor Warns 'We Cannot Save You' During Hurricane Irma

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Models show Hurricane Irma is on track to directly hit Florida by Saturday. Florida Gov. Rick Scott again warned residents against staying in evacuation zones Friday and reiterated that the state's rescue teams "cannot save you in the middle of the storm."

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with Jeff Huffman (@HuffmanHeadsUp), director and chief meteorologist of the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, about the latest on Hurricane Irma.

Hurricane Irma Makes Its Way Through Caribbean, Wreaking Havoc

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Hurricane Irma continued to make its way through the Caribbean Thursday. Puerto Rico suffered power outages, but was spared the extensive devastation experienced by Saint Martin, Barbuda and other smaller islands.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson finds out what to expect next with Jeff Huffman (@HuffmanHeadsUp), director and chief meteorologist of the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network.

Congress To Address Self-Driving Car Regulations

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

The U.S. House of Representatives is set to vote Wednesday on a bill that would allow automakers and technology companies to test more self-driving cars.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Tony Romm (@TonyRomm), senior editor of policy and politics for Recode, about the vote.

'Dreamer' Responds To Trump's DACA Announcement

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Thais Marques was marching at the base of New York's Trump Tower Tuesday when the White House announced its plans to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA.

Marques (@thais_tweets), who was brought to the U.S. illegally from Brazil at the age of 5, has been a beneficiary of the program for more than four years. Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with her.

Harvey Victims Return Home, But Concerns Linger

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Just over a week after Hurricane Harvey caused unprecedented damage in southeast Texas, some residents are beginning to make their way home. In Houston, the mayor says the nation's fourth-largest city is now "open for business."

But the recovery is expected to be long, with floodwaters remaining in many homes and lingering concerns over environmental issues such as the lack of safe drinking water. Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti talks about the challenges ahead with NPR's Carrie Kahn (@ckahn) in Houston.

How Natural And Urban Design In Texas Contributes To Flooding

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Officials expect more than 30,000 people may be forced out of their homes in Texas by surging flood waters. The damage is raising questions not only about the state's preparation leading up to now-Tropical Storm Harvey, but also about the layout of its natural landscape and urban design.

Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti learns more about the link between Texas's land and flooding with Samuel Brody, a Houston resident trapped by the waters. He is also professor in the department of marine sciences at Texas A&M Galveston and director of the Center for Texas Beaches and Shores.