Harvey Victims Return Home, But Concerns Linger

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Just over a week after Hurricane Harvey caused unprecedented damage in southeast Texas, some residents are beginning to make their way home. In Houston, the mayor says the nation's fourth-largest city is now "open for business."

But the recovery is expected to be long, with floodwaters remaining in many homes and lingering concerns over environmental issues such as the lack of safe drinking water. Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti talks about the challenges ahead with NPR's Carrie Kahn (@ckahn) in Houston.

Lessons Learned From America's Earliest Natural Disasters

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

The phrases "unprecedented" and "beyond anything experienced" have become commonplace since Hurricane Harvey wreaked havoc along the Gulf Coast. But natural disaster is not new in America.

From Philadelphia's deadly yellow fever outbreak in 1793 to the Galveston hurricane of 1900, the country's earliest disasters have taught valuable lessons for preventing loss of life in the modern era. Historians Ed Ayers (@edward_l_ayers) and Joanne Freeman (@jbf1755) speak with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson about those tragic events and how federal and local governments adapted for the future.

Ayers and Freeman are co-hosts of the podcast BackStory, which is produced at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

DJ Sessions: The Many Forms Of Modern Gospel

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Cecilia Webb loves traditional gospel music. She grew up on it. But over time as she's seen its sound evolve, Webb's come to embrace all forms of the genre.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson gets a tour through gospel, from modern performances of traditional to contemporary, with Webb, host of "Train to Glory" Sunday mornings on KUNM in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Music From The Segment

Melvin Williams, "How I Got Over"

Bishop James Dixon II, "Trust in the Lord"

The Clark Sisters, "Pray for the USA"

David Daughtry, "God Is Great (Leap!)"

Are Big Changes In Store For Uber And Whole Foods?

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi informed his company Monday that he expects to become the new leader of Uber. The ride-hailing company hopes Khosrowshahi can bring change to its past controversies.

Change is also expected for Whole Foods, which had its first day, Monday, as an Amazon subsidiary.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with  Jason Del Rey (@DelRey), senior editor of commerce for Recode, about what to expect for Uber and Whole Foods.

Brazil's Yellow Fever Cases Wane, But Scientists Fear Resurgence

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

There were no new cases of Yellow Fever reported in Brazil last month, a change from earlier this year when the country reported more than 700 cases, including those near big cities like Rio De Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

But scientists still fear a resurgence, especially as Brazil enters its summer months.

Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with writer Sam Kean(@sam_kean) who followed the trail of yellow fever and the push to prevent outbreak for Science magazine.

How Natural And Urban Design In Texas Contributes To Flooding

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Officials expect more than 30,000 people may be forced out of their homes in Texas by surging flood waters. The damage is raising questions not only about the state's preparation leading up to now-Tropical Storm Harvey, but also about the layout of its natural landscape and urban design.

Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti learns more about the link between Texas's land and flooding with Samuel Brody, a Houston resident trapped by the waters. He is also professor in the department of marine sciences at Texas A&M Galveston and director of the Center for Texas Beaches and Shores.

Employer That Offered Workers Microchip Implant Gains International Interest

HERE & NOW

Interview | Produced by Dean Russell

Earlier this summer, Wisconsin technology company Three Square Market offered its employees free microchip implants that function like a card reader. With a wave of the hand, workers may gain access to locked rooms and pay for food and drinks in the break room.

About 50 of the company's 80 workers signed up and got their grain-sized implant on Aug. 1. Here & Now's Robin Young learns more about how the project is going from Three Square Market's CEO Todd Westby and director of international sales Tony Danna.

Touring New England: Day 16 - Little River Lighthouse

Touring New England: Day 16 - Little River Lighthouse

WILDSAM FIELD GUIDES

Essay | Written by Dean Russell

CUTLER, Maine – The tide was almost too low by the time we made it to Cutler. Terry and Cynthia Rowden waited in the harbor with the motor idling. Cynthia was holding a pizza. Cold by now. They waved us down to the landing where we shook hands and crawled into the flatboat. Michelle went first.

The Rowdens had been keeping Little River Light on and off for years. Terry was from Michigan and the lighthouse was what brought him to Cutler as a Coast Guardsman in the 60s. Quoddy Light, north about 20 miles, was his original post, but he switched with another guy who had just bought a sports car. You can't drive a sports car on a 15-acre island. Plus, a little while into his stay, he'd meet Cynthia, a local girl. They'd get married. And Terry wouldn't get reassigned to Vietnam like the other guy. [...]

Touring New England: Day 13 - Mount Washington, Part I

Touring New England: Day 13 - Mount Washington, Part I

WILDSAM FIELD GUIDES

Essay | Written by Dean Russell

WHITE MOUNTAIN NATIONAL FOREST, N.H. – It was 2:37 p.m. when the hail started to fall. I pulled up my hood and listened to the beads smack against the nylon. They jumped off the rocks, piercing the fog. I hoped they wouldn’t get any larger--there was no shelter on the ridge. Worse, with hail, comes lightning. Most hikers know how to manage an electrical storm. Get to an open field and lie down. Watch the thunderhead roll away. Advice that's no good at 6,000 feet. You can't escape the thunderhead if you are walking inside it. [...]

Earl Sweatshirt And A More Human Hip Hop

Earl Sweatshirt And A More Human Hip Hop

WBUR: THE ARTERY

Essay | Written by Dean Russell

“I made a promise,” says a young voice, hesitant, “I would never rap seriously on the radio. I’m ‘bout to break it for you.”

The voice is Thebe Kgositsile, the teenage rapper and producer better known as Earl Sweatshirt, if you know him at all. At 19 years old, Earl looks much younger in the YouTube upload from the hip hop show “Sway in the Morning.” Earl is skinny – sitting next to the hulking, 42-year-old host Sway Calloway, he’s really skinny – with a high forehead and wide-set eyes. His motions are two-parts measured, one-part unsure, as he speaks cautiously into the mic. They’re talking about one of the most anticipated hip hop releases of 2013 — his debut major label studio album “Doris”. [...]

John McCauley Raises The Bar For Folk Music

John McCauley Raises The Bar For Folk Music

WBUR: THE ARTERY

Essay | Written by Dean Russell

NEWPORT, R.I. – John J. McCauley III: It’s not a household name. Nor is the name of his band, Deer Tick. But for anyone who is familiar with New England’s folk scene; for anyone who has visited the Newport Folk Festival in its recent years; for anyone who has ever even been near Newport in the last weekend of July: you may know his face, and you’ll definitely know his voice.

It’s Friday night. The rain has soaked Newport and its flush of 10,000 festival-goers raw. I’m standing in mud, singing at full capacity, and it’s hard to tell if the wetness on my face is from a leak in the performance tent or a real, honest-to-God reaction to what I’m witnessing, what I’m hearing. [...]